Scott H. Biram

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Scott H. Biram

Something heavy is happening to Scott H. Biram. There he is, eyes rolling back in his head, arms outstretched, consumed with bliss, exhaustion, or guilt, being consigned to the old crimson river. In this moment, being baptized in blood might be Biram's dark epiphany, the 12 songs of Nothin' But Blood a conduit for an emotional fight or flight, relaying a deep personal grapple between the pure and the impure, good and bad, the beautiful dream and an ugly reality.

What in the past has been expressed through reeling irreverence and spirit-lifting profanity (which he's still got in spades; don't worry) is here a more penetrating, and chilling, version of The Dirty Old One Man Band-- self-examining and penitent, yet still as crazy as a jack-eyed preacher. On his ninth album (and fifth for Bloodshot Records) 'blood' is many, often inherently contradictory, themes: life, death, suffering, evil, commitment, legacy, atonement. Even in its title, 'Nothin' But' could mean 'all encompassing' or 'it's no big deal.' Literally, all or nothing.

There are songs where Biram -- the hard-living, whiskey-loving lifelong Texan -- howls of mortality ('When I Die'), sin ('Backdoor Man'), and guilt and frustration ('Slow & Easy'), all the while struggling with which side he'll end up on (and it probably ain't the one with golden halos and white wings). He deftly sews together a myriad of flawed everymancharacters: nostalgic, stoned veteran ('Nam Weed'); boozing, jealous lover ('Alcohol Blues'); and sadistic muses ('Church Point Girls').

The rousing Black Flag-meets-Son House boot-stomper 'Only Whiskey' punches a hole in the notion of temperance and rewrites the meaning of monogamy -- the story of a man so disillusioned with romance he reserves vice as his permanent bed partner. In 'Gotta Get to Heaven', fervent 'hallelujahs' allude to a youthful and impious Biram, who quit churchat 10 years-old but also found his life's calling when an African-American Baptist choir performed for his grade school.

Throughout Nothin' But Blood, recorded at Biram's home studio and Cacophony Studios in Austin, TX, SHB's distinct songwriting style encompasses his penchant for sludge metal and palm muting ('Around the Bend'), the raw sucker punch of punk rock ('Only Whiskey'), profound truths of sentimental acoustic blues and country ('Never Comin' Home'), the cleansing powers of gospel hymns and spiritual ballads ('When I Die'), and folk tales from the early 20th century (there has never been a more beautifully creepy and morosely slinky take on 'Jack of Diamonds').

When you boil it all down in a simmering cauldron, Nothin' But Blood is storytelling about wrongdoing and redemption. Scott H. Biram's music is from the soul, for the soul, of the soul -- and with this album, the spiritual buckshot lodges deeper than ever. Columbia, MO trio The Hooten Hallers are known for hard-traveling and wild, energetic live shows, criss-crossing their way through North America and Europe with their seemingly endless tour schedule. They continue their decade-long search for their roots, drawing from the surrounding agricultural lifestyles, the river communities, the college kids and the tweakers that roam Columbia, Missouri, all in the looming foothills of the Ozark Mountains.

The myriad of influences in their music range from pre-war blues to punk rock to dark Americana, with a thematic penchant for the strange and the unexplained. In the same vein, the Hooten Hallers’ music isn’t quite Americana and it’s not quite punk, but a bit of both, fused together in a drunken tangle.

The Hooten Hallers’ new self-titled album, out April 21, 2017 on Big Muddy Records, is the culmination of their experiences from 10 years of performing and travelling together. They’ve injected their new album with the stories and characters they’ve been meeting on the road all this time. This combined with hometown pride is key to The Hooten Hallers’ ability to ride the line between DIY punk and American roots music. Produced by Johnny Walker (Soledad Brothers, All Seeing Eyes) and Kristo Baricevic (captain in chief at Big Muddy Records), the Hooten Hallers' latest effort showcases their evolution as musicians and songwriters.

John Randall’s demonically-tinged vocals and blues-inspired, manic guitar, and Andy Rehm's screaming falsetto vocals and steady, pounding drum beat keep the band focused on their unique blend of deep blues and country punk. Kellie Everett brings the power with the deep rumble of her baritone and bass saxophones. When The Hooten Hallers come to town, you know it’s gonna be a party! Drunken Prayer is Morgan Geer’s longest running project to date. Under this alias he has released 4 LPs, a handful of singles, a live EP, and toured the world. On Drunken Prayer’s last effort, The Devil and The Blues (Fluff and Gravy Records), Geer leads another journey through America’s weird musical heritage. This record is rowdier than previous efforts due in large part to the rhythm section of Lance Wille and David Wayne Gay (Reigning Sound, Freakwater). Adding to the drag-strip atmosphere, Dallas Good of The Sadies makes a cameo on the opening track appropriately named, “Hell Raiser“. The lyrics are as sweet as they are damning, offering a window into the mind of Morgan Geer. The view that it affords is at once unsettling and familiar.

Morgan is also the current guitar player for iconic alt-country goths, Freakwater.